Chapter 16
A Community of Tennessee Writers, Readers & Passersby

Forgotten but Not Gone

T.S. Stribling, who won a Pulitzer Prize in 1933, deserves an important place in Southern literary study

Stribling, THE STOREJuly 8, 2016 In the last of a nine-essay series commemorating the centennial year of the Pulitzer Prizes, scholar Kenneth W. Vickers considers the lasting significance of T.S. Stribling, the first Tennessee writer to be awarded a Pulitzer Prize.

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A Tennessean’s Way of Seeing

Charles Wright’s Pulitzer-winning poems are Southern at their core

July 1, 2016 In the eighth of a nine-essay series commemorating the centennial year of the Pulitzer Prizes, Bobby C. Rogers remembers his teacher, Charles Wright, and Black Zodiac, the book that finally won Wright a Pulitzer Prize in 1998.

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Each the Other’s World Entire

Novelist Beverly Lowry looks back at Cormac McCarthy’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, The Road, on its tenth anniversary

June 24, 2016 In the seventh of a nine-essay series commemorating the centennial year of the Pulitzer Prizes, Memphis native Beverly Lowry celebrates the narrative voice and original prose in Cormac McCarthy’s The Road, which won the Pulitzer Prize in 2007.

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Another Realm of Being

Novelist Ed Tarkington reflects on the deep ambivalence that lies at the heart of Peter Taylor’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, A Summons to Memphis

June 17, 2016 In the sixth of a nine-essay series commemorating the centennial year of the Pulitzer Prizes, novelist Ed Tarkington considers the problematic culture depicted in Peter Taylor’s A Summons to Memphis, which won the Pulitzer Prize in 1987.

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Reconsidering My Whole Position

Robert Penn Warren’s Pulitzer Prize-winning poems finally allowed Kate Daniels to call herself a Southern writer

June 10, 2016 Robert Penn Warren is the only writer to have won a Pulitzer Prize in both poetry and fiction—and he won for poetry twice: in 1958 for Promises: Poems and in 1979 for Now and Then: Poems. In the fifth of a nine-essay series commemorating the centennial year of the Pulitzer Prizes, poet Kate Daniels remembers the way Warren’s poetry helped her confront an ugly past.

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In a Dark Wood

Novelist Adam Ross first opened the closet of adult secrets through the plays of Tennessee Williams, who won a Pulitzer Prize for both A Streetcar Named Desire and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof

June 3, 2016 In the fourth of a nine-essay series commemorating the centennial year of the Pulitzer Prizes, novelist Adam Ross considers the lasting legacy of Tennessee Williams’s two Pulitzer-winning plays, A Streetcar Named Desire and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof.

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