Chapter 16
A Community of Tennessee Writers, Readers & Passersby

Abby N. Lewis

Fish Out of Water

Cathey Daniels explores personal agency in rural Appalachia in her debut novel

In her debut novel, Live Caught, R. Cathey Daniels explores betrayal and illicit activity in the rural North Carolina mountains. Daniels will discuss the book at a virtual event hosted by Union Ave. Books in Knoxville on April 25.

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Everyone a Soldier

Historical novelist Amanda McCrina returns to WWII

In The Silent Unseen, YA author Amanda McCrina returns to the setting of her previous novel, Traitor, to look more deeply into Polish and Ukrainian experiences during World War II. McCrina will discuss The Silent Unseen at Parnassus Books in Nashville on April 5.

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A Troubled South

Lee Cole’s Groundskeeping considers love, class, and identity

In Lee Cole’s debut novel Groundskeeping, Owen returns to his hometown in Kentucky to work as a groundskeeper at a small college where he enrolls in a creative writing course. Cole will discuss Groundskeeping at Parnassus Books in Nashville on March 3.

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Secrets and Questions

Julia Watts’ latest novel takes on faith, sexuality, and family loyalty

Kody, the 16-year-old protagonist of Julia Watts’ Needlework, secretly enjoys dressing up like his idol, Dolly Parton. When he receives a Facebook message from a young woman who claims to be his sister, Kody finds himself forced to keep more and more secrets from those he loves.

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Cooking with Umma

Suzanne Park’s So We Meet Again combines humor, family, and cooking

In So We Meet Again, Suzanne Park’s second novel for adults, investment banker Jessie Kim is fired suddenly from her Wall Street job and returns home to Nashville to live with her parents and reconnect with childhood friends. Park’s lively rom-com addresses the sexism and racism of the workplace while also delivering sweet and savory dishes with a Korean-American family twist.

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Workshop Dispatches

Sewanee writers share thoughts on craft

The essays in As We Were Saying: Sewanee Writers on Writing illustrate a multigenerational love for the art of storytelling. Editors Wyatt Prunty, Megan Roberts, and Adam Latham gather a diverse group of Sewanee Writers’ Conference speakers and workshop leaders to share their wisdom on the power of language.

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