Chapter 16
A Community of Tennessee Writers, Readers & Passersby

Tim Henderson

Saints in Limbo

Saints in Limbo

River Jordan
WaterBrook Press
352 pages
$13.99


“River Jordan’s Saints in Limbo is a compelling story of the mysteries of existence and, especially, the mysteries of the human heart.”

Ron Rash, author of Serena

Take Me to the River: An Autobiography

Take Me to the River: An Autobiography

Al Green with Davin Seay
A Cappella Books
352 pages
$14.95


“Reveals the small-town gospel-choir member’s incredible journey to become one of the greatest soul singers of all time. Green’s memoir is as touching and piercing as his voice is silky-smooth.”

Essence

At Home in Tennessee: Classic Historic Interiors

At Home in Tennessee: Classic Historic Interiors

Text by Donna Dorian, Photographs by Anne Hall
Louisiana State University Press
224 pages
$49.95


“The rooms shown in this volume are glimpses into the past. They reflect the aspirations of their owners to present a public face and to care for their most precious treasures — their families. In several ways, these historical families are just like ours today. Our homes are an extension of ourselves, of who we believe we are or who we wish others to think us to be.”

Mark Brown, director of Belmont Mansion

Looking for Salvation at the Dairy Queen

Looking for Salvation at the Dairy Queen

Susan Gregg Gilmore
Three Rivers Press
304 pages
$14


“If I had to make a comparison, I would compare Susan Gregg Gilmore to Fannie Flagg, but Gilmore more than holds her own. This is an unusually engaging novel by a very fine writer who knows exactly what she is doing.”

Lee Smith, author of The Last Girls

Cottonwood Spring

Cottonwood Spring

Gary Slaughter
Fletcher House
416 pages
$24


“Author Gary Slaughter’s previous books Cottonwood Summer and Cottonwood Fall established the identity of the small town of Riverton MI during the mid-1940’s. He’s created in the characters of two 10-year-old boys, Jase and Danny, a vehicle that helps guide readers through the landscape of Riverton during the war years. … Operating with the innocence and resilience of children, the pair always manages to save the day. They also help others in the town find a way to feel grateful despite the many problems and worries that still affect them.”

Ron Wynn, Nashville City Paper