Chapter 16
A Community of Tennessee Writers, Readers & Passersby

Chandeliers and Self-Discovery

Claire Fullerton’s new protagonist comes of age in 1970s Memphis

Set in 1970s Memphis, Claire Fullerton’s latest novel, Mourning Dove, captures its characters’ failing efforts to maintain Southern decorum in a swiftly changing world. Fullerton will appear at Novel in Memphis on September 11.

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An Occupational Hazard

In Depth of Winter, Craig Johnson puts Sheriff Walt Longmire in a different cold place

In the latest Walt Longmire mystery, Craig Johnson sends his protagonist south of the border, where Walt must confront his greatest challenge: a hot landscape with a cold heart. Johnson will discuss Depth of Winter at the 2018 Southern Festival of Books, held in Nashville October 12-14.

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A Stolen Life

Zora Neale Hurston relates the stories of an extraordinary survivor of the transatlantic slave trade

When she died, Zora Neale Hurston left behind a manuscript that tells the story of the last living survivor of the transatlantic slave trade. The editor of the book, titled Barracoon, is the Hurston scholar Deborah Plant who will appear at the 2018 Southern Festival of Books, held October 12-14 in Nashville.

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The Ground Is Swollen With Your Name

Trauma runs throughout Tiana Clark’s I Can’t Talk About The Trees Without The Blood

The poems in Tiana Clark’s debut collection, I Can’t Talk About The Trees Without The Blood, propel us into encounters with traumas ancient and immediate, blurring any distinctions of time. Clark will appear at Ruby in Nashville on September 9, and at the Southern Festival of Books, held October 12-14.

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Home to the Mountain

In Ronald Kidd’s new middle-grade novel, a boy’s journey leads to understanding

Ronald Kidd’s new middle-grade novel, Lord of the Mountain, is set in Bristol, Tennessee, in 1927—the time and place of country music’s “big bang.” Kidd will appear at the 2018 Southern Festival of Books, held in Nashville October 12-14.

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The Darkness at the Door

Brantley Hargrove tells the story of a storm-chasing, tornado-catching legend

Tim Samaras, writes Brantley Hargrove in The Man Who Caught the Storm, “accomplished meteorology’s equivalent to the moon landing.” Hargrove will appear at the 2018 Southern Festival of Books, held in Nashville October 12-14.

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