Chapter 16
A Community of Tennessee Writers, Readers & Passersby

Monday’s Child

The second book in Natalie Lloyd’s Problim Children series is a rollicking adventure filled with uncanny delights

In The Problim Children: Carnival Catastrophe, Chattanooga author Natalie Lloyd weaves startling visions, family secrets, and magical powers into a perfect balance of sweet and tart that’s just plain fun. Lloyd will appear at the 2019 SCBWI Fall Conference autograph party in Franklin on September 14 and Ya-Hoo Fest in Chattanooga on September 21.

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Living Like a King

Derrick Barnes’ The King of Kindergarten joyously addresses one of childhood’s biggest milestones

Award-winning author Derrick Barnes’ latest book, The King of Kindergarten, celebrates the joy and pride of a child’s first day of school. Barnes will appear at the 2019 Southern Festival of Books, held in Nashville on October 11-13.  

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The Best-Laid Plans

A fiercely independent teen must learn how to trust and rely on others

In Better Than the Best Plan, Lauren Morrill’s teenage protagonist finds herself unexpectedly tossed into the foster care system.

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Family Curse or Just Bad Luck?

A young woman seeks to unravel her family’s dark secret

House of Salt and Sorrows follows a young heiress as she grapples with a mysterious family curse. Erin A. Craig will discuss the book at Novel in Memphis on August 6 and Parnassus Books in Nashville on August 24. 

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Teaching and Unteaching—and Entertaining All the Way

For more than three decades, Patricia McKissack has been writing children’s books that bring to life the stories, and the truth, of her ancestors

As she was coming of age in Nashville in the 1950s, there were many places award-winning children’s author Patricia McKissack was not allowed to go. She remembers hotels and restaurants that forbade African Americans entry, and movie theaters with a separate doorway in the alley for black patrons. The farthest reaches of the Grand Ole Opry’s balcony, known as the buzzard’s roost, was the only seating open to African Americans, McKissack recalls. She never partook: “My grandfather said that watermelons would bloom in January if any of his children went down there. ‘We don’t sit in no buzzard’s roost,’ he said. ‘We’re human beings, not buzzards.'”

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Meeting in the Middle

Julia Watts’s new novel for teens finds room for friendship in the so-called culture wars

Quiver, Julia Watts’s new novel for teens, is a story of acceptance against all odds. 

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