Chapter 16
A Community of Tennessee Writers, Readers & Passersby

Emily Choate

Of Facts and Fables

Maurice Carlos Ruffin discusses his mesmerizing debut novel, We Cast a Shadow

Maurice Carlos Ruffin casts a satirical spell in his debut novel, We Cast A Shadow. Its unnamed narrator, driven by fierce love for his son, makes decisions that expose his family to the dangers of a world that may seem dystopian but in fact lies excruciatingly close to our own. Ruffin will appear at the 2019 Southern Festival of Books, held in Nashville on October 11-13.

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Eye of the Beholder

Ottessa Moshfegh discusses beauty, humor, and the ecstasy she finds in writing

By turns provoking and illuminating, Ottessa Moshfegh’s My Year of Rest and Relaxation speaks to our modern anxieties and absurdities, revealing what endures inside us no matter how we try to numb or distract ourselves. Ottessa Moshfegh will appear at the Southern Festival of Books, held in Nashville on Oct. 11-13.

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In That Sacred Space and Sound

WordStream, a Knoxville-based reading series, showcases an exciting cross section of writers

WordStream: The Weekly Writer’s Voice, a reading series launched earlier this year in Knoxville, provides a stage for an exciting array of writers and performers. The show is recorded live each Friday on the WDVX Stage at the Knoxville Visitors Center.

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Pursuers of the Myth

In The Secret Token, Andrew Lawler excavates the many theories surrounding the vanished colony of Roanoke

In The Secret Token, Andrew Lawler investigates the fate of the vanished colony of Roanoke Island, the first English settlement on North America. Andrew Lawler will appear at Parnassus Books in Nashville on June 18 and at the East Tennessee History Center in Knoxville on June 19.

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Waging War Through an Ethic of Care

In To Live Here, You Have to Fight, Jessica Wilkerson examines the role of women activists in Appalachia

In To Live Here, You Have to Fight, Jessica Wilkerson sets out to show that women were consistently present, active, and influential in social-justice and labor movements in twentieth-century Appalachia, bringing with them the insistence that their roles as caregivers be counted as worthy aspects of citizenship.

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Life After Life After Life

Nora McInerny rebuilds her life after deep loss in No Happy Endings

In No Happy Endings, Nora McInerny recounts her struggle to embrace a new season of life even as she grieves the brutal constellation of losses she has endured—her father’s death, a miscarriage, and the death of her first husband—all in six weeks. McInerny will discuss No Happy Endings at Parnassus Books in Nashville on May 9.

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